The Peck Group, LC - Tax Law
Free 30 minute telephone consultation
Free 30 minute telephone consultation
email us
Comprehensive Tax Law Representation Since 1995
We handle every aspect of tax law: preparing tax returns, representing clients during audits, resolving IRS and state tax controversies, and creating tax planning strategies for the future.

Does overtime get taxed differently than regular time?

| Oct 1, 2018 | Tax Law |

You’ve had a lot of extra expenses lately—and money has been tight. So when your boss gives you the chance to work overtime, you jump on it. Time-and-a-half pay is just the extra income you need.

But when pay day arrives, the increase on your paycheck isn’t as high as you’d expected. What’s going on? Is overtime pay taxed at a higher rate?

How overtime is calculated

Any non-exempt employee is legally required to earn 150 percent of their usual hourly rate for any time worked beyond the 40-hour work week. If you normally earn $20 per hour, then you would earn $30 for each overtime hour you work. This is your gross income—i.e., the amount you earn before anything is taken out for taxes or deductions.

Withholding for overtime pay

Withholding tax is not calculated differently for overtime pay than it is for regular pay. However, if you work overtime, this increases your gross pay—which could bump you into a different wage bracket with higher income tax withholding rates.

For example, if you’re a single person who makes $20 per hour, your gross income in one 40-hour work week would be $800. For tax year 2018, your income tax withholding on this amount would be $18.30 plus 12 percent (which equals $83.82).

However, let’s say you also work five hours of overtime. Now your new gross income for the week is $950, which pushes you into a higher wage bracket, where your withholding is $85.62 plus 22 percent (which equals $115.32).

Therefore, although you earned an additional $150 that week, you also had an additional $31.50 withheld from your paycheck—which you may not have been expecting.

For more information on how income tax withholding works, see our post on how the new tax law can affect your paycheck withholding.

We insist that your taxpayer rights are protected and your options are known.

Our services are confidential and are protected under the attorney-client privilege as allowed by law.